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By Owen Hatherley

A darkly funny architectural consultant to the decrepit new Britain that neoliberalism built.
Back in 1997, New Labour got here to strength amid a lot speak of regenerating the internal towns left to rot lower than successive Conservative governments. Over the following decade, British towns grew to become the laboratories of the recent company financial system: gleaming monuments to finance, estate hypothesis, and the provider industry—until the crash.

In A advisor to the recent Ruins of serious Britain, Owen Hatherley units out to discover the wreckage—the structures that epitomized an age of greed and aspiration. From Greenwich to Glasgow, Milton Keynes to Manchester, Hatherley maps the derelict Britain of the 2010s: from riverside house complexes, artwork galleries and amorphous interactive "centers," to purchasing department stores, name facilities and factories become pricey lofts. In doing so, he offers a mordant statement at the city surroundings within which we are living, paintings and devour. Scathing, forensic, bleakly funny, A consultant to the recent Ruins of serious Britain is a coruscating post-mortem of a get-rich-quick, aspirational politics, a super, architectural "state we're in." 250 black-and-white photos and illustrations

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A Guide to the New Ruins of Great Britain

A darkly funny architectural advisor to the decrepit new Britain that neoliberalism built.
Back in 1997, New Labour got here to energy amid a lot speak of regenerating the internal towns left to rot less than successive Conservative governments. Over the following decade, British towns grew to become the laboratories of the hot company economic climate: sparkling monuments to finance, estate hypothesis, and the provider industry—until the crash.

In A advisor to the hot Ruins of serious Britain, Owen Hatherley units out to discover the wreckage—the structures that epitomized an age of greed and aspiration. From Greenwich to Glasgow, Milton Keynes to Manchester, Hatherley maps the derelict Britain of the 2010s: from riverside condominium complexes, artwork galleries and amorphous interactive "centers," to procuring department shops, name facilities and factories become dear lofts. In doing so, he presents a mordant statement at the city atmosphere within which we are living, paintings and devour. Scathing, forensic, bleakly funny, A advisor to the recent Ruins of significant Britain is a coruscating post-mortem of a get-rich-quick, aspirational politics, an excellent, architectural "state we're in. " 250 black-and-white photos and illustrations

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Collins’s little Letchworths in the northern suburbs were inadequately emulated by the city council in the form of the inept Flower Estate adjacent to the university, its ‘workers’ cottages’ and treeless streets the incongruous setting for perhaps the nastiest of its wide variety of nasty places. This is a place of which I have particularly bitter memories, having lived there as a teenager: most of what I remember is ubiquitous casual violence, something especially fearsome in ‘Daisy Dip’, the estate’s little park, where a friend was baseball-batted for dyeing his hair.

5 million. Local government has not factored this in since the effective abolition of the Metropolitan Councils of the West Midlands, Greater Manchester, Merseyside, Tyne & Wear and West Yorkshire in the 1980s, along with the more notorious destruction of the Greater London Council. The capital partly recovered from this through the less powerful, more symbolic Greater London Authority, but the smaller metropolises never got theirs back in any way, shape or form. Accordingly, they tend to think of themselves as being far more provincial than they actually are.

Someone in Liverpool once impressed upon me that the difference between these two one-time transatlantic ports, the thing that makes the smaller of them the more brutal, is the lack of sentiment and civic pride. Liverpool has a whole mythology, however dewy-eyed, of its own importance and civic munificence; Southampton knows it fucking hates Portsmouth but proclaims very little else about itself. At a stretch, perhaps, it is proud of being the embarkation point of the ‘world’s biggest metaphor’ in 1912, and the former home of Matthew Le Tissier, England’s most underrated footballer.

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